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Matthew D. Friend © 2013

WOOD RIVER TIMES
T.B. PICOTTB, PUBLISHER
MARCH 4, 1885

MORE TROUBLE

This morning some men on their way to the Queen of the Hills and Minnie Moore mines were stopped by an angry crowd at Broadford, who loudly declared that no work would be done until the mine owners should guarantee $4.00 per day. Superintendent PALMER, who was with his men, remonstrated with the crowd but to no purpose. One of the crowd informed Mr. PALMER that he could go through in open ranks to his mine; but that not one man could go with him.

Mr. PALMER, thereupon, retired to Bellevue and came on here to procure the arrest of some of the disturbers of the peace on the charge of conspiracy. He stated, while here, that he would exhaust all lawful means to gain free access, for himself and men, to his mine.

JOHN GALBRAITH, JOE GOSSE, and another man are reported to have reached the mines and to be at work there. The two former are in the Queen of the Hills, the latter in the Minnie. They got to the mines early this morning, shortly after six o'clock. It was currently reported on the streets of Bellevue that they would be forcibly removed from the mines by the Miners Union. If this is attempted there will doubtless be bloodshed, because GALBRAITH is as determined a man as there is in the world.

LATER

At three o'clock this afternoon it was reported that GALBRAITH had been beaten half to death on coming out for dinner.

The International Hotel, in Bellevue, was rung up by telephone, and asked about GALBRAITH's whereabouts.

"He was just here, washing his head," replied the voice.

"Then he is not half killed?"

"No, has a few cuts about the head, neck and face - that's all. He had a regular rough and tumble with the mob."

"We heard here that Captain LUSK had got wild and dragged him out of the crowd?"

"No GALBRAITH isn't the kind of a man, who needs to be dragged out--he can drag himself out."

Honorable JAMES H. HAWLEY (who in the absence in the East of his junior partner, is acting District Attorney) filled out twenty warrants, and will go down with Sheriff FUREY tonight, to serve them. Before doing so he will remonstrate with the miners and endeavor to obtain their promise as men of honor, that they will not disturb the peace. If they refuse to so promise, he will let the law take its course.

THE MEN T0 BE ARRESTED

Following are the names of the men for whom warrants were issued this afternoon:

FRANK THOMPSON, CHARLES FOLEY, JOE WILHOIT, JOHN O'CONNORS, JOHN O'NEIL, JAMES O'NEAL, JOHN MCSORLEY, C. DURHAM, TIM KEEGAN, DENIS SWEENEY, MARTIN FAY, JOHN O'DONNELL, JERRY HARRINGTON, MIKE ROURKE, JOHN CONNELL, John Doe, RICHARD ROE, John Doe No. 2, RICHARD ROE NO. 2, MIKE HENNESSY.

ANOTHúR LOT OF MINúRS ARRESTED

Last evening Acting District Attorney hawley and Sheriff FUREY went down to Bellevue to meet Judge Waters, when the three were to proceed to Broadford to talk the matter over with the miners. lf they agreed to maintain the peace, the warrants would not he served: if they did not, than they were to be served.

When Mr. FUREY and HAWLEY reached Bellevue, they learned that no meeting of the Union had been arranged for. Mr. HAWLEY being ill went to bed, and Sheriff FUREY accompanied by Mr. WATERS, went over to Broadford and served his warrants. ED O'BRIEN a fellow whose contempt for decency and recklessness will be readily admitted when it is stated that he formerly circulated the "snide" here -- was hauled in as RICHARD ROE, and JOHN CONNELL could not be found. But seventeen men were served and brought up here today. They were arraigned in the Probate Court, when Judge WATERS, who appeared for them, waived examination and accepted the complaint as a deposition. The notices sent by the Union and introduced last week in evidence were admitted all this being to prevent the defendants from being liberated on a writ of habeas corpus.

It being alleged that MARTIN FAY, MIKE HENNESSY and JOE WILHOIT were not connected with yesterday's "overt act," they were held for further consideration.

All the other defendants were held to appear before the grand jury, in the sum of S500 each.

The court then proceeded to inquire into the second charge against CHARLES FOLEY, to wit: that of drawing and exhibiting a deadly weapon.

FOLEY HELD ON ANOTHER CHARGE

C.B. PALMER sworn: Resides in Bellevue; is superintendent of the Minnie Moore mine, at Broadford. Between ten and eleven o'clock yesterday morning was on his way to the mine. with men who had agreed to go to work. Knows defendant FOLEY; recollects his being in the crowd yesterday, while witness was on the road to the Minnie Moore mine. We were stopped upon the road by a number of men - about 30 -- who told me that I could go on, but that the men with me would not be allowed to. I stood there, talking and remonstrating with them for some time, and in the course of the discussion one of the party whom I believe to be the defendant at the bar -- CHARLES FOLEY -- rushed at me in a threatening manner.

He called me a son of a bitch and to get the hell out of the country, at the same time drawing a revolver from his side pocket.

A defendant, interrupting "That's a lie, PALMER."

The Court -- Silence, there! If such a thing as this happens again, I will impose a severe penalty on the offender.

Acting District Attorney HAWLEY - And I, your honor, if a witness of mine is ever interrupted in this manner again, will call for the severest penalty of the law.

Mr. PALMER resumed: I swear that all but a small part of the revolver was out of the man's pocket.

Judge WATERS -- The defendant makes an entirely different statement -- Mr. HAWLEY -- interrupting - If you withdraw your waiver, we will introduce our evidence.

Mr. WATERS - No; we maintain our waiver.

CHARLES FOLEY was held to appear before the qrand jury in $500 in addition to the other bond.

ATTEMPT AT CONCILIATION

Sheriff FUREY, Honorable JAMES H. HAWLEY and Judge WATERS will probably go to Broadford this evening, where there will be Union meeting and endeavor to obtain a hearing. They will do this in the interest of the miners, of the taxpayers, and of the law and order, and for the purpose, if possible, of avoiding further trouble and expense.

THE MINERS UNION BOYS

The second batch of Miners' union boys, arrested on a charge of conspiracy, were promptly bailed out, last evening. Following is a list of the defendants and their bondsmen:

JOHN O'CONNORS -- C.R. RAYMOND and J.M. HAYNIE.
TIM KEEGAN -- G.W. RICHARDS and E.B. TRUE.
DENNIS SWEENEY -- JOHN CONDRON and H. LUFKIN.
ED O'BRIEN -- JOHN CONDRON and H. LUFKIN.
JOSEPH WILHOIT -- JOHN CONDRON and H. LUFKIN.
CHARLES FOLEY -- JOHN MURPHY and WM. WELCH.
CHARLES FOLEY -- (charge of drawing and exhibiting a deadly weapon, $500.) JOHN MURPHY and WM. WELCH.
JOHN O'CONNELL -- JOHN MURPHY and WM. WELCH.
JOHN O'NEIL -- A. MCMASTER and JOHN MURPHY.
A.THOMPSON -- W.H. BOWMAN and JACOB CLARK.
C. DURHAM -- W.H. BOWMAN and JACOB CLARK.
JOHN MCSORLEY -- Q.A. FRENCH and JACOB CLARK.
MIKE ROURKE -- H. LUFKIN and JACOB CLARK.

THE SITUATION BELOW

The situation in Bellevue and Broadford today is one of grave solicitude. District Attorney HAWLEY, Sheriff FUREY and Judge WATERS attended a meeting of the miners, last night, and endeavored to persuade them to preserve the peace.

This forenoon GALBRAITH saw GEORGE STRIDE in a crowd. This man is said to weigh 180 pounds, and had applied opprobrious epithets to GALBRAITH. He was standing with a crowd of acquaintances. GALBRAITH walked into the midst of the crowd, and struck STRIDE a blow that knocked him down. PAT FUREY promptly arrest GALBRAITH, took him to court, and has him fined $42. STRIDE is not a member of the Miners' Union.

This exasperated the miners and they began collecting and walking up and down the streets of Bellevue, whispering and gesticulating. From these movements it is evident there is some deep scheme afoot, the result of which may be seen before morning. The gravest fears are entertained. Sheriff FUREY will be on hand tonight, with a force of deputies. and if necessary, will have the streets patrolled all night.

There is still hope of averting further trouble by judicious action, and Sheriff FUREY will endeavor to do all he can to maintain the peace.

Later 5 o'clock p.m. President ATKINSON, of the Bullion Miners Union, who has just come up from Bellevue, says that the miners can be counted on to preserve the peace; that they love law and order, just as much as anybody. The trouble is that there are a few hot heads whom although members of the Union, do acts that the Union disapproves of. These men may cause some trouble: but no general disturbance need be feared so long as the union is controlled by its present officers.

P.S. SAM FRIEND came up from Broadford today. He reported 15 or 20 sheriff's deputies in charge of the mines there, and everything quiet. From other sources, we learn that there are 10 men at work in the Queen of the Hills mine, and an equal number at the Minnie Moore. Telephone reports from Broadford, yesterday and today report everything quiet.

CITATION

Newspaper Title: Wood River Times
Publisher: T. E. Picotte
Date Published: 4 Mar 1885
Article Title: More Trouble
Extracted By: Charlotte Slater [lotties@xxxxxx.xxx]
Sent to: Matthew D. Friend [thefriendfamily@xxxxxx.xxx]
Date: Sunday, January 25, 2004 4:36 PM

 

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